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what we do

"We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children."

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sustainable

We seek innovative design solutions which provide a balance of environmental sensitivity, social equity, and economic viability. We are committed to creating sustainable places that meet today’s needs, while being conscious of how we will live tomorrow . We don’t give lip service to sustainability – we live this in our office, in our homes, and in our practice.

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creative

We believe everyone has something to offer. Our firm is based on a flat organizational structure, providing opportunity for all of our staff to be involved in decision-making processes. We find this enhances the design process and results in a superior final product.

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design

EnSite, Inc. is a leading Florida based design firm. Our services include Planning, Landscape Architecture, Civil Engineering, Urban Design, Sustainability, and Graphic Design. Our team is committed to the long-term success of the communities in which we live, work, learn, and play.

our portfolio

#enrichment

"We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give." - Winston Churchill

Who are cities for?- equity for tomorrow

Who are cities for?- equity for tomorrow

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Who are cities for?- equity for tomorrow

The National League of Cities released a new report this week that should make some elucidating weekend reading. "The Future of Equity in Cities" presents a view from a crossroads. The report beautifully illustrates the third component of sustainability - listed last mostly because of the three, it has yet failed set fire in popular consciousness. That's a mistake, but it's not too late to fix it. We at EnSite have put a good deal of effort into promoting an interconnected set of considerations that comprise sustainability: environmental, economic and equitable - the 3 Es, if you will. So we're pleased NLC has devoted 52 pages to the question of what kind of visioning and effort we can dedicate to the third component as we face the future. NLC's report captures what's at stake, why it starts with cities and why it should matter to everyone. As it says in the intro, "Cities are reshaping the story of America." Does that story look the same to you as it does to every other resident of your city? No one loses when we get closer to realizing that aspiration. In fact, we - all of us - only stand to gain.
Welcoming Brent Kettler to EnSite

Welcoming Brent Kettler to EnSite

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Welcoming Brent Kettler to EnSite

In case you haven't heard the good news yet, we get to work with this guy! Our principles and motivations have been aligned for a long time, but it's wonderful to have this milestone to celebrate. Please join us in welcoming Brent Kettler to our team. Here's the official news:

Brent Kettler joins EnSite as director of economic research and strategy Economic development and IT expert brings regional change perspective

FORT MYERS, Fla. (Sept. 19, 2017) – Economic development professional Brent Kettler has joined the award-winning team at EnSite, Inc. as its director of economic research and strategy. He will lead the planning and design firm in building, growing and developing a data-driven design element for current and future business. Kettler brings a unique economic development background, focusing primarily on workforce development, small business expansion and regional collaboration. Most recently Kettler served as the executive director of the Hendry County Economic Development Council. A seasoned IT analyst, he also served as the business intelligence and technology manager on the business recruitment team at the Lee County Economic Development Office. EnSite tapped Kettler to lead a new planning approach emphasizing the inclusion of site, and overall business and community impact analysis. This approach will be added to the firm’s projects, ensuring a net community benefit and alignment with the EnSite mission. Kettler’s understanding of the local business landscape, as well as pending regional workforce efforts, the key stakeholders involved and their potential impact on growth in SWFL, extends beyond the purview of traditional planning and engineering firms. The EnSite team is positioned to grow and lead by example with a dedicated focus on high-impact elements such as corporate social responsibility as a core business function and a true data-driven philosophy to design solutions that meet the needs of all community stakeholders in a sustainable fashion. Internally, Kettler will be responsible for building out several new business support tools and systems, as well as expanding the value of EnSite’s services through enhanced reliance on emerging GIS solutions. Through his continuing involvement in the Futuremakers Coalition, an initiative of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, as well as various other SWFL boards such as the Southwest Florida Workforce Development Board, Kettler has demonstrated his dedication to regional collaboration and the fostering of key partnerships to create livable communities that cultivate their own robust workforce pipeline. EnSite Principal and Director of Landscape Architecture Jonathan Romine said, “Brent brings a unique mix of technical skill, big picture thinking and passion for the values that EnSite has grown up on over more than a decade. We couldn’t ask for a better fit to expand our presence and align the objectives we share with our communities.” Kettler said, “EnSite values relationship building, collaboration, education and questioning anything that doesn’t necessarily make sense, and that pretty succinctly describes who I am as a person. We have a golden opportunity to approach opportunities to help growing communities make the correct decisions at a blank slate level and to help others get out of their own way to reinvent a more sustainable future.”
Building arts into the community

Building arts into the community

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Building arts into the community

You did hear about the results of the wide-ranging Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 study, right? The Lee County Alliance for the Arts held an unveiling a few months ago. Read the Creative Placemaking article linked in the Americans for the Arts tweet above, and you begin to see the foundation of the Alliance's Master Plan. It's bigger than that - although that campus enrichment plan is going to result in a spectacular transformation. We can adopt these "creative placemaking" principles to transform our communities on a macro scale. Our Jon Romine was on WGCU Public Media's live call-in talk show Gulf Coast Live yesterday to talk about some of the placemaking aspects represented by the planning process for Gardner's Park. Give it a listen!
The future sets sail at Mote

The future sets sail at Mote

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The future sets sail at Mote

In need of an uplifting midweek story? We're excited to learn about the great work Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium up in Sarasota is doing to help kids make the right kind of waves. The AMI Kids slogan is right there on the side of the boat, "Separating a troubled past from a bright future." We will cheer on any organization that helps kids discover their inner resources and become the most productive, self-fulfilled members of society possible. At EnSite, for instance, we've been active with the STAMP and Take Stock in Children intervention programs, providing mentorship for teens as they navigate adolescence and the possibilities for college or career. And we're also big on the power of outdoor learning and field trips. It makes so much sense that giving kids a direct experience with the natural environment helps them learn to love science and want to protect our natural resources. But it also imparts confidence, builds teamwork and develops leadership skills in a really powerful way! Here's a link to a larger description of Mote's program. What's your favorite program to help kids chart a course to the future?
The missing letters in

The missing letters in "success"

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The missing letters in "success"

How do you spell success? Hard work, determination and innovation? Certainly those can be critical determinants in going from the idea stage to successive (ahem) milestones. A big piece of the puzzle, though, is often missing from biographies of the great American tycoons. Yes, intelligence is a basic prerequisite for growing and maintaining a business. And emotional intelligence has rightly gained prestige in the MBA textbooks - managing relationships is a basic concept to any entrepreneur. That takes care of IQ and EQ. But those letters fail to give the A-to-Z big picture of success. What's missing? Well, we didn't think to use the abbreviation LQ until we happened upon this Inc. Magazine article. That's right. The founder of China's Amazon equivalent, Alibaba, sites LOVE as the most essential element of success. Maybe that word sounds a little bit mushy for the marble halls of corporate lexicon. Go ahead and argue with a man whose net worth is valued at almost $40 billion. With a B. But let's leave the almighty dollar for now. It's not the mighty part of the equation, anyway. At EnSite, the importance of LQ is a "duh" concept, and it's how we've differentiated ourselves over the more than 11 years since we've opened our doors. How do we spell success? By walking the walk when it comes to corporate social responsibility. By aligning our mission with causes that strengthen our community. By giving our team members the space to live their ideals and contribute in the way that let their talents shine. In short, by loving what we do and loving the place where we live, work, learn and play (those are all four-letter words, and we're not afraid to say them - so why would love be any different?). Actions speak louder than words, right? We believe actions that contain a good LQ speak the loudest of them all.
Growing a solution for public health - trees

Growing a solution for public health - trees

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Growing a solution for public health - trees

We happened upon this intriguing Facebook post and thought it would be a great share as we head into the weekend. Naturally, we caution a little skepticism with the headline. While "urban greening" is an important component, any approach to enduring public health solutions must consider many complementary factors. There is no component that can claim to be "the" key. That being said, go ahead and click the above link for a good overview of a new report from The Nature Conservancy. Smart Cities Dive is an industry-specific aggregation media site for busy people. Know anybody like that? If you're like us, though, you'll want to go straight to the report and dig in. You might find that your weekend plans include planting a tree. We enjoy the Conservancy's treatment of funding and policy as fundamental considerations. Is your health worth the money? Comment on the Facebook post that brought you here!
Economic inclusion for growth: look to the cities

Economic inclusion for growth: look to the cities

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Economic inclusion for growth: look to the cities

“Preparing a broader and more diverse set of firms, workers, and communities to reach their productive potential offers a compelling opportunity for growth. Metropolitan America should seize it.” That's the conclusion of a comprehensive new report released by the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings. The results are summarized in an article the institute published yesterday titled "Opportunity for growth: How reducing barriers to economic inclusion can benefit workers, firms, and local economies." Diversity. Inclusion. When it comes to urban policy, these are not warm and fuzzy catchphrases bandied from ivory towers. Growth initiatives, if they are to be truly effective, cannot remain separate from inclusion initiatives (contrary to the habit many cities have cultivated, intentionally or haplessly). Brookings lays out these key findings: - The economy is not working for all people and places, and cities and regions are a critical scale at which to address the challenge. - Reducing barriers to economic opportunity in U.S. metro areas can enhance economic growth. - Growth is necessary to make regional economies more inclusive. - Growth actors - employers and the economic development organizations (EDOs) that represent them - have an important role to play in joining inclusion actors - community development, workforce development, and social justice organizations) - to reduce the barriers that prevent firms, workers, and communities from meeting their productive potential. There is a lot to digest here. A major takeaway, though, is that when we set the stage for educational success, entrepreneurism and upward mobility, growth accelerates in a manner that allows more stakeholders to benefit. "Cities and regions are a critical scale at which to address the challenge," Brookings asserts. Shouldn't we start there? Read the entire report here.
Alliance Community Cleanup day - Sept 23 2017

Alliance Community Cleanup day - Sept 23 2017

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Alliance Community Cleanup day - Sept 23 2017

Many hands make light work, the saying goes, and we saw that concept in action last weekend when dozens of Southwest Florida citizens descended on the Alliance for the Arts with chainsaws in tow, plus plenty of community spirit. The News-Press latched onto that spirit with this uplifting article, some much-needed good news after the fright and tribulations associated with Hurricane Irma. We've witnessed many acts of kindness after the storm. Sometimes events that are bigger than us serve as a kind of crucible, forcing the true nature of our community to bubble up to the surface. More hands are needed at the Alliance, so another clean up day is scheduled for this Saturday. Go get your booster shot of community spirit. It will be good for you.
Placemaking from the sky - public art builds community

Placemaking from the sky - public art builds community

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Placemaking from the sky - public art builds community

There's a video going around that seems to have powerfully captured the internet's imagination. A collective called Poetic Kinetics creates shimmering sky-scapes that have people looking up, up and away. What captures our imagination is this public art's powerful ability to influence what's happening on the ground. Starting off with footage of the installation called "Liquid Shard," this short exploration of PK's portfolio jumps off to other celestial-spanning streamer collages that fly in concert, echoing the murmurations of swallows or silvery baitfish. Lovely stuff, especially with the chosen background music in the film. We're captivated by the ability of public art to call people together, to experience a familiar space in a novel way, to linger for no reason except to enjoy something senselessly beautiful. "Liquid Shard" is an installation that was created under cover of darkness overnight as a surprise gift for the neighbors and visitors to Pershing Square. Angelenos were given the opportunity to view this space in a new way. And millions of internet users are able to engage with an artful Los Angeles. Poetic is right. Public art has intrinsic value, of course. And we're especially moved by projects that are presented as a gift to a community. Public art is also an essential element and expression of the ideals of placemaking. And to that we say, the sky's the limit.
leif it to the expert - green up your knowledge

leif it to the expert - green up your knowledge

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leif it to the expert - green up your knowledge

Surely his fate was sealed when his parents bestowed upon him the homonym. We can hear them now, the playground taunts he might have endured: Hey, why don't you make like a tree...and Leif! "How original. I've never heard that one before." Well, however it was that Leif Johnson happened upon his affinity for leaves, we're glad for it. It's deep summer here in SW Florida. Native Virginia creeper is overtaking the cabbage palms. Our native landscaping projects are maturing. Everything is green, green, green. But how does it all work? How do leaves - from the fronds of our yards' birds of paradise to the grasses of our marshes to the cooked greens on your dinner plate - soak up our region's generous sunlight to produce that glorious hue? Photosynthesis, you say? Chlorophyll, sure. Your high school biology teacher might be content that you remembered even that much. Did you even pay attention? Leif Johnson is one of those rare scientists who not only know their stuff, but can rhapsodize about their subject, inject humor and take us along for a deep dive into their world and make us care deeply about it. He's even generated a hashtag, #LeafLove. Enjoy this thoroughly engaging article from Johnson, a Conservancy of Southwest Florida biologist, and tell us if it doesn't make you feel a heck of a lot more connected to the work green leaves do to breathe, feed and grow - and in return, shelter, feed, and equip us in many ways we rarely take time to consider. In offering our landscape architecture expertise, we are privileged to enjoy a close relationship to the plant kingdom. Even we, though, can sometimes use a little reminder to slow down, make like a tree...and breathe. Leif Johnson was recently interviewed on our local NPR affiliate, WGCU. Tune in and catch some dream green. We did!
How do you love Florida? Let FNAI count the ways

How do you love Florida? Let FNAI count the ways

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How do you love Florida? Let FNAI count the ways

The weekend came and went, and summer break is almost done for families of young ones. We're still a couple months away from the cooler weather that Southwest Floridians crave all summer, but the wildlife viewing opportunities that make our region so vibrant are always available. If it's been a while since you've taken inventory of the amazing and varied plants, animals, coastline, wetlands and forests of this great state, you don't have to go far to get caught up. Have you ever heard of the Florida Natural Areas Inventory? Here's the mission of that nonprofit organization administered by the University of Florida: ...to collect, interpret, and disseminate ecological information critical to the conservation of Florida's biological diversity. FNAI's database and expertise facilitate environmentally sound planning and natural resource management to protect the plants, animals, and communities that represent Florida's natural heritage. FNAI even has an interactive map displaying Florida's conservation lands. Click on any of the features, and you'll unlock a treasure trove of facts and info to help you plan your next outing. Yes, it's hot out. But this resource is just too cool!
Calling all FutureMakers - your survey answers needed

Calling all FutureMakers - your survey answers needed

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Calling all FutureMakers - your survey answers needed

What's 15-20 minutes when the future is depending on you? If you're an employer in Southwest Florida of any type, FutureMakers is calling on you to take part in an important survey.

We're passionate about this kind of thingWhy? As EnSite principal Jon Romine said, "A community cannot be sustainable without a robust future workforce that is properly educated to anticipate the next generation’s challenges."

Right now the rate of post-secondary degrees or certificates in the region is pretty low. FutureMakers wants to change that. You can help!

Happy birthday, IMAG!

Happy birthday, IMAG!

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Happy birthday, IMAG!

Kids of all ages are invited to a birthday party! The first 250 who qualify as children by virtue of their chronological age will receive a present. For the rest of us, the guest of honor is a gift in and of itself.

IMAG History & Science Center is celebrating its facility’s 22nd birthday on Saturday, August 12 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and you're invited! Click here to find out all the details.

We hope to see you there to enjoy food trucks, interactive STEM and history stations, buy-one-get-one admissions, a gift for the first 250 children, a preview of a one-of-a-kind virtual reality (VR) exhibit, and special giveaways. IMAG's open regular hours that day, too.

The Imaginarium Science Center, with its iconic water tower, has been a steady presence in Fort Myers for more than two decades now. Earlier this year, it merged with the Southwest Florida Museum of History to create IMAG, and an exciting blend of exhibits and hands-on activities that combine history focused on Southwest Florida with science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

The birthday party on August 12 will gives guests the opportunity to preview a new, highly immersive VR experience – Virtual Fort Myers: The Past Meets the Present. Scheduled to fully open on August 19, this experience is the ultimate STEM and history combination and is indicative of the innovative approach IMAG is taking to implement its new mission.

Our Jon Romine is past president of the Imaginarium Group. He said, “Science and history are so intertwined in Southwest Florida that they can’t be separated. The two museums can tell a much greater story when they tell it together.”

We at EnSite think it's only fitting that the community should come together to celebrate that legacy of storytelling, because it belongs to all of us. So, let's party!

The arts mean business - AEP5 shows us the money

The arts mean business - AEP5 shows us the money

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The arts mean business - AEP5 shows us the money

The arts is one of the key ingredients for creating a sense of place. They bring people from diverse backgrounds together to experience creativity and new ways of thinking that can help solve social issues. And doesn't it just make sense that businesses interact best in a creative environment?

We all know that "the arts mean business*," but sometimes in policy discussions or even education budget decision making, somehow the arts get short shrift. Why is that? Maybe because its champions haven't always done the best storytelling in tying arts to measurable return on investment. Remember the "Show me the money!" line from that movie a few years back? Well, we're pleased to now be able to do just that.

In Lee County, 41 nonprofit arts and cultural organizations provided detailed financial and event attendance information about their organization to help Americans for the Arts complete its Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 study. Maybe you've heard about this important study, because it really did make some waves, as reported in The News-Press, Gulfshore Life, WGCU and Florida Weekly. Why all the fuss? Check out the bottom line: try on $140 billion - with a "b" - for size. That's the amount that arts and cultural organizations, plus their audiences, spent in fiscal year 2015. Put another way, Lee County's economy received that potent shot in the arm as a direct impact of arts spending.

There are many more interesting numbers that complete the picture, and you can enjoy a snapshot view of this very comprehensive study or read the full report at a link provided by the Alliance for the Arts, here. You might notice the EnSite logo at the bottom of that page. We are an annual sponsor of the Alliance, because we already know the arts mean business. Just think - $140 billion. With a "b." Way to go, Lee County!

*Robert L. Lynch, CEO of Americans for the Arts "...Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 offers a clear and welcome message: the arts are an investment that delivers both community well-being and economic vitality.

Back to School Supply Drive

Back to School Supply Drive

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Back to School Supply Drive

By now, you're probably familiar with our dedication to education and our work with the Foundation for Lee County Public Schools. So naturally, we'd want to help that excellent organization get out the word about its back to school supply drive. Every student deserves a fresh start with all the tools they need to get the most out of the school year. Consider the following: The Foundation for Lee County Public Schools Inc. is seeking individuals, businesses and organizations to participate as drop-off locations for its annual Back to School Supply Drive throughout the month of July. Donations will benefit the Foundation’s Education Resource Center, which provides Lee County’s public school educators access to new and reusable classroom supplies at no cost. Suggested donations include notebook paper, pens, pencils, crayons, glue sticks, rulers, notebooks, three-ring binders, scissors and backpacks. Donations can also be made online at kitsforkidz.org. Those interested in donating or participating as a drop-off location can contact Margo Brewster at (239) 337-0433 or margo@leeschoolfoundation.org. Donations may be tax-deductible. Monetary donations can be made on the web at www.leeschoolfoundation.org or mailed to The Foundation for Lee County Public Schools, P.O. Box 1608, Fort Myers, FL 33902.

Business for Good

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Business for Good

We recently participated in Mediaplanet’s Business for Good campaign where we united with industry leaders to educate young entrepreneurs, potential investors, non-profits and businesses looking to launch their own CSR initiatives for successful corporate philanthropy implementation, while simultaneously celebrating the organizations leading the charge in using business as a force for good. The Business for Good campaign was distributed through USA TODAY on June 23th 2017 and is published online. For the full campaign, visit: http://bit.ly/2sOZICy.
12 years in, sustainability remains the focus

12 years in, sustainability remains the focus

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12 years in, sustainability remains the focus

We've been so busy we hardly noticed our business just reached the 12-year mark. The principles that made us different in the urban design/planning/engineering/landscape architecture space are still what we hold near and dear today. Aside from the technical expertise and customer service excellence you should expect of our type of firm, EnSite is defined by our horizontal leadership structure, focus on corporate social responsibility and sustainability. We thought it would be fun to share this old video that was produced on the occasion of being rewarded the first-ever Chrysalis sustainability award from the Horizon Council back in 2012. A lot has happened since then (anyone remember Jon's buzz cut?), but we still like to share this as a reminder that sustainability has three components: -environmental -economic -social equity When all three come together, the future is in very good hands. The hairstyles, though - those are just going to keep changing.
Discover the world outside your bubble

Discover the world outside your bubble

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Discover the world outside your bubble

As urban designers and planners, we seek solutions to help folks get what they need within a small swath of geography. A focus on mixed use development and walkable solutions means more folks will be able to get around on foot or bike from home, to work, to public green spaces for recreation, to retailers to do their shopping and to service providers' offices. We work to combat the short-sighted, vehicle-centric planning practices of the second half of the 20th century that result in sprawl. We tout placemaking as a way to increase community engagement with a community's assets. These strategies proceed bit by bit, and they take time. If successful, these communities develop a distinctive neighborhood character, and its residents, businesses and other stakeholders become more connected with one another. An unintended consequence is that once a community member's needs are met within this mixed-use framework, he or she starts to exist in a bubble. The NPR podcast Invisibilia recently profiled a successful millennial named Max Hawkins who recognized that his own daily routine had created a bubble around himself. It was, as the show points out, a beautiful bubble, with lots of inviting sights, friendly people, good food and many more pleasing things to enjoy. Nonetheless, his commute, work environment and home neighborhood exerted a limited effect on his experience. So he created an app to help him discover experiences he never would have happened upon from within the shiny sphere that insulated him. We will let you listen to the story yourself. Perhaps you'll recognize the ways in which you've built your own bubble around yourself. Is it a beautiful bubble like Max's? Even if it is, are there ways you could expand your experience by "randomizing" it just a bit? Maybe for an hour a week? Half a day? Or several times a month? Walkable cities and placemaking will always be worthy endeavors for us. But we're also driven to provide connectivity, both within and between the urban centers where lots of life takes place. There's nothing wrong with a bubble, but isn't it nice to occasionally squeak past its protective membrane and travel through the bubbles of those around us? Travel doesn't have to be overseas. Sometimes the next bubble over is worth the bounce.
When it comes to health and happiness, big cities win

When it comes to health and happiness, big cities win

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When it comes to health and happiness, big cities win

It's the first Wednesday in June, which means it's National Running Day. As over two million people from different countries around the world prepare to go out for a run, we'd like to take the time to appreciate how important active living environments are to our communities. Sidewalks, roads, parks and green space not only provide us with a place to exercise, they also make for healthier Americans. Before you go out for your morning jog, take a look at how smart urban planning has an impact on our overall health and wellbeing.

Research shows Americans in big cities are healthier, happier

When it comes to overall health and happiness, why do big city residents win out over those from smaller communities? In the article Here’s Why Big Cities Are Healthier, Maggie Fox explains why city folk end up on top largely because of sidewalks, parks and good public transport. According to a report by Gallup and Healthways, community investment in active living environments such as bike paths, parks and walkways had positive effects on the overall health and wellbeing of residents. Furthermore, research shows that access to green spaces encourages exercise and healthier eating, leading to lower stress levels and rates of disease. The top five cities that scored the highest on health and wellbeing were Boston, San Francisco, Chicago, Washington, D.C. and New York. Residents in these cities showed significantly lower rates of smoking, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and depression. Sources: NBCnews.com, RunnersWorld.com
Step it up for World Environment Day 2017!

Step it up for World Environment Day 2017!

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Step it up for World Environment Day 2017!

Despite our differences, the billions of individuals who live on Earth have one thing in common: their home planet. And maybe like you, we didn't realize today was World Environmental Day until we clicked on the Google Doodle. That search engine behemoth is directing clicks from that pretty green treatment of its iconic moniker to materials like its environmental commitment report, an article about how its Google map vehicles are being outfitted with air pollution meters, and many cool maps imaging tools tracking illegal fishing and forest loss. Your journey to greater environmental awareness starts with a single step.

World Environment Day is the United Nations' 43-year-old vehicle for promoting environmental awareness. However old you are, you can also serve as such a vehicle - and with just your own two legs. The theme for 2017 is connecting people with nature, which caught our attention, because it's a big part of what we try to do! So how will you celebrate? Plan a trip to visit a national park. Plant a tree. Or just go outside and splash in the first big puddles of Southwest Florida's rainy season.

And consider the following - yes, the environment is a global health issue. We mean this in the nicest way possible - go take a hike!

what inspires us

shellie johnson

shellie johnson

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shellie johnson

The Mother Hen The quality of life that a community has to offer is only as good as what its residents are willing to work for. The people at EnSite make Shellie Johnson excited to come to work everyday. “I work with a fantastic, energetic and creative group that is respectful of one another and most important, likes to have fun,” she said. Working with and taking care of the needs of a small firm is a natural extension of small-town home life for the LaBelle resident. Loose ends are a foreign concept to Shellie, as her focus on details runs deeper than even her credentials from the American Institute of Certified Planners can testify. Shellie is one of EnSite’s owners and in her role as Planning Director, she assists private clients in gaining development entitlements to property. She also assists government jurisdictions with daily planning tasks such as development reviews and regulatory amendments, and with long-range planning projects. When she’s not at work, Shellie volunteers as President of the LaBelle Downtown Revitalization Corp. The group’s efforts have not only made good on its name, but it has also caused a resurgence in residents’ pride in their community and instilled a sense of ownership in the beautiful historic downtown. She enjoys being part of a small town and contributing her time and energy in preserving its sense of community while creating opportunity to encourage younger generations to stay there and prosper. Shellie is a recent widow who enjoys being close to her three stepchildren. Her three dogs run her life. She likes spending time in the outdoors, hiking, and kayaking. She loves to eat great food.
brent gibson

brent gibson

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brent gibson

The Solutions Guy Work smarter, not harder. Brent Gibson enjoys the laid-back, open culture and family-like atmosphere of the EnSite office, which he thinks promotes creativity. “Also, everybody has a voice in what happens with the company. Whether you’re the newest employee or one of the owners, your ideas will be heard and considered.” That flat organizational structure also has a way of encouraging folks to reach beyond their job descriptions to do whatever it is that has to be done. As Lead Designer, Brent does most of the civil engineering design. He also oversees production management, and is responsible for scheduling and getting the designs and plans out the door to clients and municipalities. He also serves as the in-house IT guy. The McGregor Veterinarian Clinic is one of many projects that served as a proving ground for Brent’s creative problem-solving skills. While employing low-impact development techniques, the EnSite team met the challenges presented by Lee County’s newly drafted Compact Communities Planned Development zoning code. This code emphasizes mixed-use and compact development, rather than separate uses with the large setbacks often seen in sprawl development. Brent has been married to his wife Emily for 16 years, and the couple has three boys and a girl between eight and 15 years old. He enjoys playing golf and basketball, and coaches youth basketball at the local YMCA. He’s also on the board for Big Brothers Big Sisters and is a mentor in the Foundation for Lee County Public Schools STAMP program. Twitter: @BGib4
brian smith

brian smith

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brian smith

The Design Doctor Do unto others as you would have others do unto you. The Golden Rule was frequently evoked by the single mom who raised Brian Smith and his older sister. Another favorite quote was “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.” Brian said, “Watching her struggle through life taught me the values of hard work and determination to make a better life for the family. She is certainly my early inspiration and drive to do better and to work hard and value what I have and to cherish family always.” Fortunately, coming to work at EnSite means much more than a paycheck to him. An EnSite owner, Brian values his co-workers, the atmosphere, and the variety of projects the team gets to work on. As Director of Land Design for the company, Brian is responsible for site planning and project management. It’s thrilling to prepare a plan that exceeds the client’s expectations, whether it is a 4,000-acre new community or a .75-acre commercial project requiring innovative design solutions. “Problems” is a word he banishes from his vocabulary. There exist, rather, solvable issues, and the team works with surgical precision to work out solutions to those issues. Few people are aware that Brian’s alternative career path would have led him to being an emergency room doctor. He maintains that laughter is the best medicine, and employs plenty of humor in his work and family life. He and his wife of 15 years, Christy, have two boys, aged 13 and 11. In keeping with his mom’s example, he says, “They are everything to me.” His family enjoys spending time outdoors.
jonathan romine

jonathan romine

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jonathan romine

The Big Picture Thinker There is no limit to what can be accomplished when no one cares who gets the credit. - John Wooden EnSite owner Jonathan Romine is obsessed with metrics. Aside from hard numbers, he has a major soft spot for people. Every day represents a new opportunity to help someone succeed or empower a whole community of “someones” to make a better future. Of course he pays close attention to the many details of running the business, from finance and investment to R&D and marketing strategy, but it’s the big picture that really matters. By maintaining everything in ship-shape condition, EnSite’s team can consistently deliver optimal results for its clients. His biggest consideration is the company’s culture, which is at the heart of everything EnSite does. On the practice side, Jonathan’s official title is Director of Landscape Architecture, but he describes himself as a “mentorholic.” All staff members are given room to grow their creative talents, develop their leadership skills, and pursue their dreams. Moreover, the organizational structure is horizontal, meaning no one holds a monopoly on good ideas. Jonathan’s passion is making a positive impact on the community in which he lives, works, learns, and plays. Therefore, he’s especially proud of EnSite’s public sector and non-profit projects, such as parks, community planning, redevelopment/infill plans, and arts and cultural institutions. Jonathan has a daughter, Ava, with wife Megan. He loves sports and travel, and supporting these community organizations: The Imaginarium Science Center (current President of the Board), The Foundation for Lee County Public Schools (Board Member and Mentor), Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce (Board Member), Rotary Club of Fort Myers South. Twitter: @rominejl
matt horton

matt horton

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matt horton

The Boundary Pusher It’s in the doing that the idea comes. Like every team member at EnSite, Matt Horton enjoys the horizontal structure, which affords him the opportunity to work in the trenches, where the best ideas come from. Top-down organizations often suffer some delusion when they think innovation can come from the ivory tower. As Director of Urban Design, Matt has been able to push boundaries and enjoy the freedom to develop innovative solutions. Every EnSite project is special, but a particularly gratifying one is Gardner’s Park in downtown Fort Myers. “This was probably the most fun of my career, because the owners and residents were very enthusiastic and helpful throughout the project,” he said. Starting out as a guava farm in the 1800s, Gardner’s Park is a lively district featuring community events, galleries, boutiques, cafés, theater, and attractions such as The Burroughs Home & Gardens, The Butterfly Estates, and the Langford-Kingston Historic Home. When he’s not leading EnSite’s urban design activities, Matt is doing the important work of being a dad to his two sons, ages eight and nine. Beyond those two jobs, he finds there are even more boundaries to push: having completed the St. Anthony’s Triathlon in Sarasota after losing a bet, he was hooked and has been training and competing ever since. He’s done three Ironmans, but not the big one in Hawaii…yet.

what makes us awesome

"There is no limit to what can be accomplished when no one cares who gets the credit." - John Wooden

2012 Horizon Council General Business Award

2012 Horizon Council General Business Award

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2012 Gulfshore Business 40 under 40 Award - Jonathan Romine

2012 Gulfshore Business 40 under 40 Award - Jonathan Romine

2012 Florida Commissioner of Education Business Recognition Award

2012 Florida Commissioner of Education Business Recognition Award

2012 Chrysalis Award for Sustainability

2012 Chrysalis Award for Sustainability

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2012 Lee County School District Business Partner of the Year

2012 Lee County School District Business Partner of the Year

2010 Blue Chip Finalist

2010 Blue Chip Finalist

2010 Creating Better Places Design Competition - First Place Overall

2010 Creating Better Places Design Competition - First Place Overall

why ensite

"Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential." - Winston Churchill

EnSite, Inc. has been passionate about improving the Southwest Florida community since it was founded in 2005. The firm is focused on sustainable design that engages and inspires. It achieves its award-winning results through a fanatical commitment to communication plus its unique combination of creativity, technical expertise, project management efficiency, and intelligent teamwork. We believe that any company’s ability to deliver results that exceed expectations is a necessary function of its organizational culture. EnSite’s culture, which is at the heart of everything we do, strongly emphasizes empowerment and accountability, collaboration, innovation, and a meaningful investment in the communities where we live, work, learn, and play. It’s a privilege to offer our services, which enhance the quality of life of the place we call home, including land planning, landscape architecture, civil engineering, and urban design. Every client receives focused personal attention by working directly with a principal of the firm, while EnSite’s collaborative team structure increases design efficiency and promotes creative problem-solving and creativity, leading to well managed projects and, most importantly, customer satisfaction. EnSite’s unique business model enables our clients to enjoy the talent, assets and results of a large firm, but with competitive fees and top-notch personalized service. Our principals possess great communication skills and are intimately involved in every project from start to finish—they personally plan, design, permit, inspect, and certify every single one. Our community engagement doesn’t end with our many projects. EnSite’s team members are engaged in many service organizations and projects outside of work. And as a team, we reach out to local schools, universities, municipalities, and organizations through our EnRichment program to educate students of all ages and establish relationships and civic engagement to further enhance the experience of living in Southwest Florida.

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EnSite, Inc.

2401 First Street
Suite 201
Fort Myers, FL 33901

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  • @rominejl does a different kind of community building at the 200-mile @RagnarRelay South Beach w/ some new friends… https://t.co/AGCT2UMNs8 |

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